Job Search Tips

Why Including a Cover Letter with Your Résumé Can Make All the Difference

20231220_Impactful Cover LetterUnveiling the Power of Personalized Job Applications

In HR, recruitment, and career counseling, a hotly debated topic is whether job seekers should include a cover letter with their résumé. As an experienced professional in this field, I firmly believe in the value of a well-crafted cover letter.

A cover letter is more than just a formality; it's an opportunity. While a résumé outlines your professional qualifications, a cover letter lets you tell your story, showcasing your personality and passion. It lets you explain how your experiences align with the job and the company's values.

Many argue that cover letters are outdated and that recruiters don't have time to read them. However, in my experience, a compelling cover letter can make a candidate stand out. It demonstrates effort and a genuine interest in the position, qualities that are highly valued in any candidate.

I recall a recent graduate from a certification program who applied for a computer support specialist position. Her résumé was similar to others, but her cover letter spoke volumes about her determination to learn and her understanding of the company’s brand. This personal touch led to an interview and, eventually, a successful hire.

.   .   .

An effective cover letter should be concise and tailored to the specific job. Start by researching the company and the role. If possible, address the letter to the hiring manager and open it with a compelling introduction. Focus on how your skills and experiences align with the job requirements and the company's culture.

A cover letter can be a powerful tool in your job application arsenal. It provides a unique opportunity to communicate directly with potential employers and to stand out in a crowded job market. I encourage all job seekers to take the time to craft thoughtful, personalized cover letters. It could be the deciding factor in landing your dream job.  Go here to read my The Art of the Cover Letter series.

#CoverLetterAdvantage #JobApplicationSuccess #RésuméAndCoverLetter #CareerGrowthTips #StandOutJobSeekers

 

 


Hire Power - The 6-Step Process to Get the Job You Need

Hire PowerTwenty-nine years ago, Irv Zuckerman published a marvelous book, Hire Power - The 6-Step Process to Get the Job You Need in 60 Days - Guaranteed! He made a book purchase money-back guarantee that a job seeker will get a job offer within 60 days if they followed the fool-proof Process in his book.

A lot has changed in those 29 years, certainly not the least of which is the advent of internet job boards. I don’t know how many readers got a job offer in 60 days by following the Process outlined in his book or how many job seekers tried to get their book purchase returned.

What I do know is his 6 step process is as relevant today as it was in 1993.

Step 1:  Learn how to create a word bank of 200 words that best describe your most significant achievement and demonstrate your skills.

Step 2:  Learn how to use your word bank to create the kind of self-presentation that will initiate professional discussions with people who can help you match your skills to the criteria of the job you want.

Step 3:  Learn how to ask the one question that best initiates a contact conversation from which you learn the criteria you must meet to get the job you want.

Step 4:  Learn how to create a competitive resume that draws on your word bank to match the job criteria you want.

Step 5: Learn how to conduct a competitive job interview that demonstrates your ability to meet each of the job criteria best

Step 6:  Learn how to develop a post-interview procedure that keeps the odds in your favor despite other candidates or interviewers.

Any omission alters the Process, and when you change a process, you naturally alter the results.


Working the Hidden Job Market - The Basics

Everyone you meet is a potential lead when actively looking for work.  Since you rely on friends and acquaintances to help you locate work, make sure you handle yourself well. This means that you develop and maintain a reputation as someone that does excellent work, is reliable, trustworthy, punctual, etc. Your friends will have a hard time recommending or asking questions on your behalf if you are not someone worthy of working with.

Volunteer. Many organizations rely on volunteers, and this can be an excellent way for you to become known in the community and expand your skills at the same time. The added benefit is that you get to give back to your community.

Do Your Research. Read the news, investigate companies, and do your homework to learn about companies that interest you or are in your area. Check their websites (and their career postings on those sites) while you develop an idea of what they are like, who their clients are, or why you would want to work for them.

When you are working the hidden job market, you are promoting yourself. Do it happily and shamelessly to get the job you want. Take advantage of publishing software to create a business card or postcard (because you won't be carrying your resume everywhere you go, but you could manage a postcard). Imagine a postcard that advertises who you are and what you can do. Make sure you aren't shrinking your entire resume onto the card; leave plenty of space.


The Importance of Values When Seeking Employment

The Important of Values When Seeking Employment (1200 x 1200 px)Values exist at your very core. Understanding what you value means targeting the right companies for the right job. When our values are inconsistent with a workplace, we disengage and leave it physically or emotionally.

Do you know the things that are important to you? Although they may struggle with putting their values into words, people often do. Define what is important to you in terms of work and decide what kinds of jobs you will look for or companies you will consider.

Your values are fundamental to you. It's essential to match your values with those of your work. For example, if one of your values is about being paid what you are worth. You work somewhere that pays everyone the same wage no matter how much work they do; your values don't match the organizations. There may not be a big problem initially. Still, over time, if you observe that people are getting paid the same as you without seeming to work as hard, you may become cynical. Suppose you value the idea that teamwork and the efforts of the team combine to make the company do well. In that case, you may not have any difficulty having everyone paid the same wage.

 

# #employment #seekingemployment #seekingjob #jobhunting


How Does the Job Search Pyramid Work? Step One

Job Search Pyramid
Let's first look at how to use the Pyramid to manage your entire job search from beginning to end. Then, I'll walk through it step by step, just as you might look for a job.

Before starting your job search, you need to know what type of job you want to pursue. So, you decide to explore several areas, both inside and outside the industry in which you've been working. First, you research several industry trends using the Internet, newspapers, and trade journal articles. Then, you look at job listings to help you understand what challenges these industries currently have and who is hiring.

The word "industry" refers to an industry, a job field, or both. For example, you may define the type of work you are looking for by naming an industry such as health care or food service. Or it may make more sense to describe it by naming a job field that exists in multiple industries, such as information technology or accounting. In some cases, you will narrow your definition to include industry and job fields, such as health care accounting. Think of your industry as being the phrase you use to complete the sentence, "I'm looking for a job in…"           

You contact professional associations that support the industries you are exploring and arrange for informational interviews with people experienced in those fields. Conversations with people in your current sector point you toward an area where they need people with your experience. But you also discover through researching some specialized job listings that your skills would easily transfer to a completely different industry, which interests you more. So, you decide to pursue this new career change when looking for your next job.

My favorite way to help know what you want is to use one of the O*Net Interest Profilers at MyNextMove.org. The Occupational Information Network (O*Net) is a free online database that contains hundreds of occupational definitions to help students, job seekers, businesses, and workforce development professionals to understand today's world of work in the United States.

Using the interest profiler at MyNextMove.org is free and straightforward to use. It helps you identify where your career interests lie, then points you directly toward career paths that might match those interests. 

Are you ready to graduate from Knowing what you want to Finding contacts and opportunities? Then, watch for our next post!