Career

Work Satisfaction is Vital!

"Vocation" is the word we use to describe a calling or work where you find purpose. Working within your vocation means it is much more likely to enjoy your work. Work satisfaction is vital as you look in terms of the next job that you want to do. 

That may sound vague, so let's flesh it out a little. Your vocation, or purpose, is a theme for your entire life, not just work. The type of service you are here to provide is the aspects of life that you will serve, protect, or heal. 

Your purpose is present in every area of your life. It is:

  • Fun
  • Absorbing
  • Energizing
  • Fulfilling
  • Something that fits you absolutely 

You know you are living your purpose when:

  • You like getting up in the morning (or at least most mornings!)
  • You can see the contributions that you are making through work
  • Your income meets your needs and goals
  • Your relationships are satisfying
  • You feel healthy and energetic
  • You feel good about yourself

Managing Change During a Job Seach

Finding a new job involves making changes and handling transitions, which we can manage very well when prepared. Change is a part of life, and changing jobs is a part of the world of work in many ways.

Everyone's adjustment period to change is unique. It is easiest for those who are flexible in their approach in different circumstances at life and work but can be devastating for people who cannot let go. Change can be awkward at first, but it can also be exhilarating, like being propelled into a steep turn on a roller coaster. It can motivate you to do your absolute best. During change, time can seem to move very slowly for the reluctant, but it can be a whirlwind for those ready for it.

Change is needed if we are unhappy with where we are, when old practices or processes no longer work, or when a job no longer exists. It can be like pulling a new sweater on over your head; for a moment, you cannot see, but you know you will feel warm and comfortable once you can get your head out of the hole.


Support for Your Job Search

Job Search Support
A job search buddy is a friend or colleague who also wants help to get into action and stay on track with his or her job search. The two of you assist each other in reaching your goals by setting up a regular check-in, with each of you reporting on progress, announcing successes, and stating challenges. The buddy’s job is to listen, celebrate, commiserate, and be a brainstorming partner.

Job search support groups serve the same function for a group of people who wish to work together. Again, there’s a wealth of information Online about job search support groups. Or, you may be able to find an existing support group for job-seekers through career centers, schools, and industry associations.

You can also hire your coach or life coach, a professional trained in assisting people in setting and achieving goals. Some coaches specialize in career transition and working with job-seekers. They may call themselves career coaches, job coaches, or career consultants. Ask your friends and colleagues if they have worked with a coach to whom they could refer you or perform an Internet search.

Keep in mind that support from a buddy, group, or coach does not involve in-person meetings and travel time. Many groups meet via telephone conference lines or live online chats, and your buddy or coach can work with you by phone, e-mail, or an online chat service or all three.


Avoid this mistake when changing #careers

Google+ (2)Professionals often initiate career changes before gaining an understanding of who they are and what they want, guidance counselor Judit Price writes. "They take a very broad approach to 'what is out there' rather than establish a clear, directed focus," she writes

Read complete article here.

 

Have you developed a Career Vision?

If someone asked you to describe your vision of the most perfect place on earth, what would it look like?  A mountaintop with a spectacular view?  A tropical island with a warm breeze, soft sand and tall palm trees?  Now suppose someone asked you to describe in similar detail your vision of the perfect career.  How do you draw a picture of something you can't yet clearly see?


In developing a career vision, you are creating a work picture of where you want to go with your career, If you can visualize  your ultimate goals, it will become easier to choose what your next job should be.  Even if some portions of  your vision are fuzzy, write down what pieces you do know.  It’s like creating the scenes of a play.  Each scene can be written independently to tell part of the story, and eventually all of the scenes add up to be complete production.